SimpleC Delivers…

Reminiscence

Validation

Music

Trusted VoiceSM

Reminiscence and reminiscence therapy

A picture or song often helps someone recall a memory or story that they otherwise would not remember. Reminiscence therapy uses this to help individuals connect with their memories. Photographs and music, as well as other objects, can be used to bridge those memories as they become less accessible in older age. The goals of reminiscing are to:

  • Facilitate social interaction
  • Bring back positive emotions
  • Improve mood status and decrease depression
  • Improve self health perception
  • Increase self-esteem
  • Increase sense of mastery and identity
Reminiscence References

Chao, S-Y., Lan, Y-H., Tso, H-C,, Chung, C-M,, Neim, Y-M., & Clark, M. J. (2008). Predictors of psychosocial adaptation among elderly residents in long-term care settings. Journal of Nursing Research (Taiwan Nurses Association), 16(2), 149-159.Pittiglio, L. (2000). Use of reminiscence therapy in patients with Alzheimer’s Disease. Lippincott’s Case Management, 5, 216-220.Woods, B., Spector, A.E., Jones, C.A., Orrell, M., & Davies, S.P. (2005). Reminiscence therapy for dementia. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001120.pub2.

Music and music therapy

The part of the brain responsible for auditory memory is particularly resilient to age-related changes and cognitive decline. Music therapy uses a person’s favorite songs to affect mood or stimulate memory. Participation can range from listening to actively singing along to improvising. The focus of using music is to:

  • Address social and behavioral symptoms
  • Improve mood
  • Improve social interaction
  • Decrease behaviors such as agitation, aggression, and wandering

 

Music References

Cohen-Mansfield, J. (2001). Nonpharmacologic interventions for inappropriate behaviors in dementia: A review, summary, and critique. The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 29(4), 361-381.

Cohen-Mansfield, J., Dakheel-Ali, M., & Marx, M. S. (2009). Engagement in persons with dementia: The concept and its measurement. The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 17(4), 299-307. DOI:10.1097/JGP.0b013e31818f3a52

Validation and reality orientation

Some seniors experience disorientation to time, place, or person. Orientation, referred to as “reality orientation” in the scientific literature, provides cues that inform and reassure residents as to where they are. Reality orientation therapy typically uses clocks, calendars, or television. The goals of orientation are to:

  • Resolve confusion and agitation
  • Allow residents to function effectively
  • Help individuals navigate their environment

Orientation References
Spector, A., Thorgrimsen, L., Woods, B., Royan, L., Davies, S., Butterworth, M., & Orrell, M..(2003). Efficacy of an evidence-based cognitive stimulation therapy programme for people with dementia: randomised controlled trial. British Journal of Psychiatry, 183, 248-254.

Tune, P., & Bowie, P. (2000). The quality of residential and nursing-home care for people with dementia.Age and Ageing, 29(4), 325-328.

Trusted VoiceSM and simulated presence

Trusted VoiceSM, a type of what is called simulated presence in scientific literature, uses familiar voices to convey a message. A familiar voice, for example from one’s child, is more effective than the voice of a stranger. In addition, a familiar voice can effectively calm someone who is agitated. In general, the goals are to:

  • Regulate emotions
  • Reduce level of anxiety
  • Reduce verbal and physical agitation
  • Provide comfort

Simulated Presence References
Cohen-Mansfield, J. (2001). Nonpharmacologic interventions for inappropriate behaviors in dementia: A review, summary, and critique. The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 29(4), 361-381.

Cohen-Mansfield, J., Dakheel-Ali, M., & Marx, M. S. (2009). Engagement in persons with dementia: The concept and its measurement. The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 17(4), 299-307. DOI:10.1097/JGP.0b013e31818f3a52

Yasuda, K., Kuwabara, K., Kuwahara, N., Abe, S., Tetsutani, N. (2009). Effectiveness of personalized reminiscence photo videos for individuals with dementia. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, 19(4), 603-619.

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